My fears or yours?

I’m afraid of clowns, dolls that blink, high places with low railings, and overpaying a lot. If you don’t share my fears you don’t need me to protect you from what frightens me. Knowing where your courage begins allows me to customize an Offer to Purchase for you, and a customized Offer where courage not fear is expressed is more acceptable to home sellers.

The Wisconsin WB Offer to Purchase documents and much of what’s in the addenda of private firms is created to be buyer-consumer safe. Inspired by intent to avoid risk (things other people fear) for inexperienced real estate buyers, the creators of these documents inadvertently created form which makes all buyers appear to be standard with common fears, reservations, and reluctance. A customized Offer to Purchase separates you from the rest by showing the Seller you are more committed, fearless, prepared, able, and reasonable.

There are at least 20 ideas to improve your Offer to capture the Seller’s attention in this competitive Seller’s market. Being afraid is OK. Being protected from other people’s fears is a choice. Expect the expert to inform and offer ideas to show your courage, instead of their fears.

Mass Produced Offer Documents Cost Home Buyers Thousands of Dollars.

You can have any color car you want, as long as you want black. The Model T was built efficiently in mass production assembly line factories,  for anyone who wanted to get from here to there on their own schedule without depending on a horse.  The mass production model groups everyone into the same box. By standardization, the producers have control, and the product is reliably consistent, even if it’s not reliably effective.

The residential offer to purchase documents (including firm crafted addenda) are  inefficient, unreliable, products costing the American home buyers billions of dollars annually.  Real estate values are pushed up and beyond the reach of a large segment of the population because these documents reduce even the most attractive buyer to ordinary. When critical terms of the Offer are equal on paper, the only difference maker in the eyes of a home seller is PRICE.

Smart Realtors know how to customize an Offer for their buyer-clients, to make the document work to their advantage while giving the owner all of the security they desire at a price they are willing to accept. A customized Offer tells the owner everything they want to know about the buyer’s commitment, ability, reliability to make a decision to commit to sell to them.  Oh, sure some people want to know about families, career, where you’re from, what you look like, how much you love their decorating, but they won’t make a commitment to take unreasonable risk because of your personal story.

Customized Offers are the solution to rejection. Customized offers don’t cost you anything. In fact, they are more efficient, more powerful, more fair, more acceptable, and can be the difference in thousands of dollars in the price you pay to own your first choice home. 60 Seconds to a Customized Offer

Is This Really a Price Escalation Offer? Probably not.

Buyer: “Mrs. Seller. You are asking $300,000 for your house. Here is my offer for $300,000.  If you get another offer by 7:00 PM tonight for $300,000 or more, my offer will then be $1,000 more than that other offer, up to $351,000.”   The first price escalation offer may have started just like this. A capable, committed, fearless buyer promising to pay more than any other offer the owner has in hand,  up to a specific amount. That’s a true escalation offer. It’s free of stipulations. No if, and, or but. This buyer is appealing.

The Price Escalation clause common in our market is remarkably diluted of fearless commitments from the buyer with weak if, and, and buts.  If we take the written watered down clause and put it in a conversation it looks like this:

Buyer: “Mrs. Seller. You’re asking $300,000. My offer is $300,000. If you have another offer in hand for $300,000 or more, I’ll increase my offer by $1,000 up to $351,000. BUT you have to show me the other offer as proof. AND I get to scrutinize it to see if that offer has credits, concessions, or seller costs which mine doesn’t have. If after I compare to make  sure we are apples to apples, and I’m satisfied, I will sign an amendment to change the purchase price. Oh, by the way; if the appraisal doesn’t support the price, I can rescind my offer. We’ll see the appraisal in oh, 30 or 35 days from now. About 5 days before closing. ” 

Every real estate licensee and attorney  sees the caveat filled contingency is trouble waiting to happen.  The buyer who needs this kind of protection is not the price escalation buyer you want. This buyer is hopeful that you will be so enthralled by the big number that you will overlook the conditions. The game is on and it’s a gambler’s game. You and the buyer are taking a chance that the appraisal will or will not support the Offer price. A low appraisal is a big win for the buyer. You’re 4 weeks closer to closing and your other buyers are gone as is your leverage.  So, before you accept an offer with a diluted escalation clause you gotta ask yourself: “Do you feel lucky?”

A skilled real estate licensee will know how to modify the Offer to protect you when this contingency shows up in your offer. It’s great to have a strong, committed buyer interested in your property. The buyer capable of a true escalation commitment won’t be afraid. You’ll know her when you see her offer.

It’s About the Net to Seller, Not the Price

There are always  gimmicks. Buyer markets gave us the Appraisal Contingency – Escape Clause, and the Buyer-Gets-the Last-Word Inspection Contingency. Seller markets spawned the Escalation Clause.  Insecurity morphed the Escalation Clause into a watered down, useless jumble of nonsense. (I’ll beat any offer price as long as I get to see the offer, and then I get to deduct a laundry list of expenses from the price, and maybe I will agree to amend our price, but I don’t have to pay this amount if the appraisal doesn’t match our price, and then….)

All of the gimmicks look like good ideas until you, ah well, look at them. People who hire smart real estate brokers as Buyer Agents get their Offers accepted by steering clear of the gimmicks. The savvy Realtor® out thinks the competition by seeing  knowing the objective of the Seller is really the Net to Seller, not the Price Offered. I believe the Wisconsin Offer to Purchase (Residential, the Condo Offer, and Vacant Lane Offer) are boiler plate forms where costs paid by Seller are pre-determined. To increase the Seller’s Net without increasing the price, financially capable Buyers will take on the Seller’s typical expenses (some may be tax deductible—see your accountant), and save themselves thousands of dollars in interest and higher property tax bills over the years of owning the home.

This weekend when you write your offer try this: Think like you are in cooperation with the Seller, not in competition. The Offer has at least 8 areas you can modify to improve the love your offer receives from the Seller…and none of them require sappy letters and photos of your kids. If you haven’t committed to a Realtor® yet, before you do, ask them what ideas they have to help you get your offer accepted. Commit to the professionals who know how to make the Offer work for you AND the Seller.

Buyer Agency

Regardless of hopes, expectations, and myths, buyer agency places the licensee and the buyer on the same side with a shared perspective. Buyer agency is a privileged relationship where the most effective assets a Realtor legally has at her disposal are available for the buyer. Without buyer agency the licensee is unquestionably working as a sub agent for the listing broker with clear obligations to the interests of the seller. There is no gray area in Wisconsin real estate agency law.

In my opinion, there is one reason for working as a buyer agent and this is it: I intend to legally provide all of the services, share all of my insight, and work with the buyer to create appropriately safe terms. And this is important: Some of those terms may be to the advantage of the seller. I believe an informed person, given logical choices, is  comfortable taking on risk commensurate with the reward.

The assumption that buyers are best served by tipping the scales of every point in their favor is dangerous in the real estate market. Price is always important and to some extent it may be second to risk. Given a competitive price, prudent sellers weigh the risks of the contingencies before committing. An attractive number with high risk and low probability of closing might appeal to the gambler, but for the typical home seller who has other plans and commitments to meet, shifting risk to the buyer in exchange for a reasonable price is a more acceptable strategy.  The wise buyer agent knows the areas of a boiler plate contract ideal for softening.   We will find some of those easy to improve areas of offers in the coming weeks of Skill Share Thursday’s at Restaino & Associates. 9:30 to 11:00. Let me know if you want to attend.

Hottest Trend in Real Estate; Price Escalation Clause

The purchase price of this Offer shall be $1,000.00 greater, up to a maximum price of $_______, than the purchase price of any bona fide offer….

Source: Hottest Trend in Real Estate; Price Escalation Clause