I don’t want to buy if or unless…the extreme cost of contingencies.

Stop right here. Let’s rethink this. Opportunities to reconsider a promise are necessary for uncommitted people. Every contingency in a residential offer to purchase says,  I don’t want to buy your house if this or that happens or doesn’t happen. Does it seem reasonable that home sellers will expect more money to exchange for more opportunities for a buyer to decide not to buy?  

Twenty pages to say MAYBE

The offer to purchase from a ready, willing and committed person could read, I will buy your house on this date, for this amount of money, which I will bring to (this place of closing). To complete the sale, you will transfer the property by a warranty deed and provide insurance of a clear title. 

A Wisconsin Residential Offer to Purchase includes at least 17 statements of I’m not going to buy your house if, or unless _________.  A typical four-page addendum of optional contingencies has 20 additional exit opportunities. Compared to the two-sentence promise of commitment, the contingency laden offer typically drafted by real estate professionals is one giant Maybe, maybe not. There is nothing safe in a maybe. 

The Price of Maybe

Security is valuable to home sellers. When a person writing an offer doesn’t know how to structure the offer to show the buyer’s abilities and commitment to close, all they have left to appeal to the seller is money. And the money they use belongs to their client. When homebuyers overpay, they’re spending equity they haven’t made yet. When real estate firms put more effort into customizing purchase agreements and less energy to capture leads, their buyer clients will reap the rewards. Until then, you’re going to pay for the right to walk away in cash or rejection.