How much should we offer?

Think broad strokes; time, security, money. Offer as much as you are comfortable and able.

Finally, a house in your first-choice neighborhood came up for sale. You’re one of many people waiting and watching for an opportunity to move into the community. Most likely, you and several others will sit down with an agent to write an offer, and I am sure of this; everyone will ask their agent the same question, “How much should we offer?” 

How much SECURITY do we offer?

I think you should offer as much of everything as you can and still be comfortable. By everything, I mean security and money. Security is time and assurance. Before deciding how much money to offer, know your strengths. Are you able to cover a few thousand dollars in unplanned expenses? Is there work you’re willing to do? Can you give the seller their choice in closing dates? Do you have the necessary documentation to prove to the seller that you have the money in the bank, or that the bank is committed to loaning the money you need? What can you put in your offer, or exclude that gives the seller the evidence that you are as committed to getting to closing as they are? I don’t mean a love letter, either. The kind of information that a seller sees as proof of unequivocal commitment is not something we say, but something we can prove, show, promise, and back with an acceptance of risk. 

How much money do we offer?

Sales of relevant homes in the neighborhood will be used by an appraiser to place a value on the property. Your mortgage lender will loan an amount relative to the appraised value. Regardless of the price you offer, the appraisal will be what the appraiser decides it to be. If the asking price is $400,000 and you offer $410,000 or $390,000, and the seller accepts your offer, you’re okay unless the appraiser decides $380,000 is the value. In that case, you may need to come up with the difference in the purchase price and appraised value.   

I can not assure anyone that they can get a home for less than the asking price. I can tell you a combination of Seller-favorable terms and a price at or above the asking price will improve your chances of an accepted offer. To set yourself apart from everyone else, regardless of the price you offer, show the seller that you have the means and are committed to keeping the price as agreed if the appraisal is less than the sales price. Doing this is a significant offer of security. So is allowing the seller to select the closing date. Saying I’m flexible means nothing. Structuring the contract’s terms to enable the seller to choose a closing date shows the seller that you are. 

Contingencies. Less is More.

Every real estate agent or an attorney can wrap your offer in so much plastic bubble wrap that you can’t possibly be hurt. Your offer won’t be accepted, but if your goal is not to hurt and not own the house, then wrap it up as you wish. Contingencies were created to protect someone from something someone fears. If you don’t have that fear, don’t include the contingency. Fewer contingencies increase the feeling of security the seller has, which’s a good thing for you. 

So, how much should we offer?  Think broad strokes; time, security, money. Offer as much as you are comfortable and able. 

REALTORS Who Respect Zillow Earn Public Trust

REALTORS, please stop resisting Zillow. They have the trust of the public. Zillow has the power they have because they figured out how to involve the consumer at the REALTOR expense.  Embrace Zillow the way the public does.

Embrace The Zestimate—It’s Your Opening

Given this choice as a customer, who are you more likely to trust and engage in a conversation: (1) The person who tells you you’re wrong, you’re making a mistake, and you’re in danger. (2) The person who compliments you in being proactive, smart, informed, and wise. Number 2 of course. When people recognize our intelligence and wisdom, our opinion of them goes up. Still, when allowed to engage in a real estate conversation when Zillow is the topic, agents tend to go straight to the party line with flawed criticism. Opportunity Lost!¬†

The wise REALTORs know everything Zillow wants them to know about Zestimates. And they want you to know: Zillow knows the Zestimate is not as accurate as you can be.  Here it is in their own words:  It is not an appraisal and it should be used as a starting point. We encourage buyers, sellers and homeowners to supplement the Zestimate with other research such as visiting the home, getting a professional appraisal of the home, or requesting a comparative market analysis (CMA) from a real estate agent.

https://www.zillow.com/zestimate/ This link takes you to Zillow’s stats for Zestimate accuracy by State. In Wisconsin, Zillow tells us up front, they are accurate within 5% of the sales price 82% of the time. Do you know what they call REALTORS who estimate a home’s value within 5% accuracy 82% of the time? Ex REALTORS. For those who point out Zillow reports that they are within 20% of the correct price, 99% of the time, consider what that means. Zillow will be wrong in every opinion. And the error could be up to 20% of the value. (A $400,000 home with a 20% error is off by $80,000.) 

Consumers Like Opinions that support theirs

Some consumers will look at an explanation of analytics after they see or hear an opinion. But that takes work. A typical consumer looks at their Zestimate and their City Assessment and decides if the number is right or wrong based on how they want the number to factor into a formula. Show me one homeowner who’s Zestimate is higher than their assessment to go into the City and demand their property tax bill to be increased. Should that Zestimate be lower than the assessment, I’m sure the assessor will soon be seeing the Zestimate as evidence. 

Never Right or Wrong…Just a Start

The Zestimate and the consumer are never necessarily right or wrong. The number is a product of analytics but the analytics still require your input. The consumer who begins with Zillow is smart. Being informed is always better than being at the mercy of someone who has an opinion. 

Attempting to undermine Zillow is futile. REALTORS who try only undermine their credibility and that of other real estate professionals. Those REALTORS who learn how Zillow works, why Zillow works, and align themselves on the public’s side with respect to Zillow will be the REALTOR of choice for people who like to be respected. It’s far easier to work with people who respect you, trust you, appreciate you for not criticizing them.